Fatty Lymphoma In Cats

By | December 23, 2017

Lipomas are soft, greasy lumps that grow under the skin. They are harmless and do not usually need treatment. Your general practitioner will usually be able to tell if the mass is a lipoma. If there is any doubt, they can refer you to a scan to check it. In rare cases, pieces under your skin may be a sign of something more serious. Lipomas are harmless. They are not usually treated on the NHS.

Secret cysts are very similar to lipomas, but there is a characteristic difference in the external appearance of the cyst secreted. Septic cyst has a central lacrimal point and surrounding induration. The abscesses have overlying induration and redness of the skin and an incision and drainage must be made for the removal of the abscess. In addition, unlike lipomas, abscesses are extremely painful and tend to be associated with systemic signs like fever.

Another subclassification of benign lipomas are the infiltrating lipomas. These usually invade locally in the muscle tissue and fascia and may need to be removed. On the other hand, liposarcomas are malignant and can spread (metastases) to the lungs, bones and other organs. These tumors are rare, but indicate the importance of examining all the subcutaneous masses respectively. Most lipomas feel soft and mobile under the skin.

Because ultrasound is highly sensitive, specific and reliable4,5 when necessary in developing countries. We recommend that ultrasound be the radiological examination of choice because it is less expensive and relatively more available in such contexts. Computed tomography and MRI are useful for evaluating the anatomical extensions of vulvar lipomas and differentiating them from liposarcomas1.

All admissions to our epilepsy monitoring unit that had had a brain MRI were screened for intracranial lipomas for 6 consecutive years. Five patients with intracranial lipomas were identified (0.14%). The lipomas were located in the median line (3 cases), in the tectal region 1, and on the parietal cortex 1. Another intracranial pathology was identified. in two patients causing epilepsy in these cases (cranial trauma and hemimedalgia).

Learn more about lumps and bumps on your pet. In this video we meet with Dr. Mona Rosenberg who is board certified in veterinary oncology. She’ll discuss the importance of checking your pets…

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