Cpt Lipoma Excision Thigh

By | January 30, 2018

Cardiac Imaging Cardiac MRI showed a solitary, strongly marginal bilobed mass originating from the endocardial surface of the left ventricle (Figure 3). No other mass was present. The movement of the regional wall near the mass was normal. The signal intensity of the mass was consistent with the fat over several pulse sequences (Figures 3 and 4). First-pass perfusion imaging with MRI showed that the mass was poorly perfused compared to normal myocardium (Figure 5).

A preliminary test tested three healthy dogs with multiple benign, superficial and easily measurable subcutaneous lipomas. One lipoma on each dog was injected with collagen and another was not treated to be used as a control. Ninety days after the injection, a CT scan showed that the lipomas treated on two of the dogs had completely disappeared and that the lipoma treated by the third dog only represented 7% of its original size.

She felt uncomfortable when she was wearing tight underwear. The physical examination revealed a single, soft, non-tender, lumpy mass in the large right labium that was about seven centimeters by five (cm) in its widest dimensions. Both cases had no history of vulvar trauma or mass discharge. Their medical, obstetrical and gynecological backgrounds were unspecific. The overlying skin was freely moving on each mass. There was no visible or palpable cough impulse or inguinal lymphadenopathy, and bimanual pelvic examinations were normal. A provisional diagnosis of vulvar lipoma was made in each case.

Sometimes a lipoma needs to be removed if it causes symptoms - for example, pressing on another part of the body. Sometimes, if the diagnosis is not clear, a lipoma is removed to look under the microscope. This is to make sure that the growth that has been detected is a lipoma and not something more serious. For a lipoma that forms under the skin, usually it can be removed by a simple minor operation. A local anesthetic is injected into the skin above the lipoma. Once the overlying skin numbs the local anesthetic, an incision is made on the lipoma. The lipoma is then removed and cut from the underlying tissue.

Third times a charm, I guess. ugh…. Sorry, this was supposed to be a simple Throwback Thursday, so I could show you how my patient is healing after having a pretty sizable lipoma was removed….

Leave a Reply