Exophytic Subcutaneous Lipoma

By | December 30, 2017

The area is draped with sterile napkins. Local anesthesia is given with 1% or 2% lidocaine with epinephrine, usually in bulk. Infiltration of the anesthetic into the subcutaneous area surrounding the operative field creates a field block. Small lipomas can be eliminated by electrolysis. An incision of 3 mm to 4 mm is made on the lipoma. A curette is placed inside the wound and used to release lipoma from the surrounding tissue.

Lipomas have been identified in all age groups but usually appear between 40 and 60 years of age. These slow growing tumors, almost always benign, are generally in the form of round, motile, non-painful masses with a characteristic soft and soggy feel. Rarely, lipomas can be associated with syndromes such as multiple hereditary lipomatosis, colorless adipose, Gardner's syndrome and Madelung's disease.

Classically trained homoeopaths such as Dr. Herman use unique remedies (not combinations) in response to the specific symptoms of their patients. "The correct cure is the one that fits the patient's overall picture," says Dr. Herman. "Lipomas are part of the chronic disease picture, not single entities." In 2004, Dr. Herman treated Anna, a one-year-old Golden Retriever, for muscle myositis. masticatory, an inflammatory muscular disease that causes pain incapacitated to open the jaw.

At the time, Anna ate groceries and took prednisone. "As she was suffering from diarrhea and her owners were not ready to give up allopathic treatment," she says, "I suggested changing her food so that it becomes a raw diet, prepared at home. "Anne has had normal annual visits since then, without any sign of illness," says Dr. Herman. "In 2010, she developed a yeast infection in her ears and I treated her with the same remedy as in 2004 because her symptom chart still corresponded to the cure. . Her ears went well in a month, and she's still fine.

There is no proven link between the development of lipomas and a particular occupation or exposure to chemicals or radiation. Some doctors believe that lipomas occur more often in inactive people. Lipomas are usually rounded masses that feel soft and chewy. Lipomas located just under the skin can be moved by gently pushing. Lipomas are usually not painful, although some subtypes may be painful, such as angiolipoma.

A lecture on Neoplasia by Dr. Gerald Abrams, M.D. This lecture was taught as a part of the University of Michigan Medical School’s M1 – Patients and Populations Sequence. View the course materials…

Leave a Reply